Managing commercial high-level radioactive waste summary.

Cover of: Managing commercial high-level radioactive waste |

Published by Congress of the U,S., Office of Technology Assessment. in Washington, D.C .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Radioactive waste disposal -- United States -- Safety measures.

Edition Notes

Book details

ContributionsUnited States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
The Physical Object
Pagination64 p. :
Number of Pages64
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16544032M

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For the management of commercial high-level radioactive waste. It represents a major up-date and expansion of the analysis presented to Congress in our summary report, Manag-ing Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste, published in April of during the debate leading to passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of (NWPA).

This new. of Federal policy for the management of commercial high-level radio- active waste-an issue that has been debated over th2 last decade and that now appears to be moving toward major congressional action. Both this summary and the full report are the final products of a 3-year effort at OTA.

During that time we have contributed to committee actions and congressional deliberations on nuclear waste management-includ.

Managing the nation's commercial high-level radioactive waste. New York: UNIPUB: Infosource International ; Washington, D.C.: In cooperation with the Office, : High Level Radioactive Waste Management: Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, May(): Books.

Managing the Nation's Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste Showing of pages in this report. PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description. A study by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) focusing on "all aspects of high-level waste disposal" (p. iii). High-level radioactive waste management covers a broad area of federal government and commercial activities. Chronologically, the first wastes of this nature were generated in the Manhattan Project of World War II vintage.

for commercial high-level radioactive waste man-agement, including interim storage and permanent disposal. NWPA provides sufficient authority for developing and operating a high-level radio-active waste management system based on dis-posal in mined geologic repositories.

Authoriza-tion for other types of waste facilities will not be. for the management of commercial high-level radioactive waste. It represents a major up- date and expansion of the analysis presented to Congress in our summary report, Manag- ing Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste, published in April of during the.

Managing the Nation’s Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste the eight problem elements evolve over time. Once those questions have been considered, we ask a third one: How did conceptualizations of the problem and deci.

Over the last decade, significant developments have taken place regarding radioactive waste management: (1) The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, concluded under the auspices of the IAEA, Managing commercial high-level radioactive waste book opened for signature in September The Convention establishes commonly shared.

Get this from a library. Managing the nation's commercial high-level radioactive waste. [United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.;]. Get this from a library. Managing the nation's commercial high-level radioactive waste: summary.

[United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.;]. Managing commercial high-level radioactive waste: [summary]. [United States. Managing commercial high-level radioactive waste. Washington, D.C.: Congress of the U.S., Office of Technology Assessment, [] "This summary presents the findings and conclusions of OTA's analysis of Federal policy for the management of commercial high.

Managing the Nation's Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste Page: 39 vii, p.: ill. ; 28 cm. This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Technology Assessment and was provided to UNT Digital Library by the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.

Description. This Safety Guide provides regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established for the predisposal management of high level waste.

iaea safety standards series no. ssg predisposal management. of radioactive waste from the use of radioactive material in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education.

international atomic energy agency vienna, Proceedings of the Fifth Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held in Las Vegas, Nevada, MayThis collection contains papers discussing current technical issues related to international high level radioactive waste management activities and their relation to society as a whole.

©— Bioethics Research Library Box Washington DC Managing the Nation's Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste. old. "Such fuel has about one tenth the output of heat and radiation as day old spent fuel, for which existing casks were designed.

Since it appears unlikely that spent fuel less than 5 (or even. Managing the Nation's Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste Page: 91 vii, p.: ill.

; 28 cm. This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Technology Assessment and was provided to UNT Digital Library by the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department. This collection contains papers on current technical and social issues related to international high level radioactive waste management activities presented at the Sixth Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held in Las Vegas, Nevada, April May 5, The commercial radioactive waste that is regulated by the NRC or the Agreement States and that is the subject of this brochure is of three basic types: high-level waste, mill tailings, and low-level waste.

High-level radioactive waste consists of “irradiated” or used nuclear. level waste and about m3 of high-level waste. According to IAEA, a nuclear reactor of MW (e) produces approximately 30 tons of high level solid packed waste per year if the spent fuel is not reprocessed.

In comparison, a MW (e) coal power plant produces tons of ash per year. However, radioactive wasteFile Size: KB. It is generally accepted that the final waste will be disposed of in a deep geological repository, and many countries have developed plans for such a site, including France, Japan, and the United States (see also High-level radioactive waste management).

Definitions. High-level waste is the highly radioactive waste material resulting from the. High-level radioactive wastes are the highly radioactive materials produced as a byproduct of the reactions that occur inside nuclear reactors.

High-level wastes take one of two forms: Spent (used) reactor fuel when it is accepted for disposal; Waste materials remaining after spent fuel is reprocessed; Spent nuclear fuel is used fuel from a reactor that is no longer efficient in creating electricity, because.

Radioactive Waste Management. This section will discuss the sources, handling, and u ltimate disposal of radioactive wastes (sometimes referred to as radwaste) generated by nuclear power plant operation.

Reactor Concepts Manual Radioactive Waste Management USNRC Technical Training Center Solid, liquid, and gaseous materials from nuclear operations that are radioactive or become radioactive. This collection contains papers on the technical and societal impacts of high-level radioactive waste presented at the Seventh Annual International Conference on High Level Radioactive Waste Management, held in Las Vegas, Nevada, April May 3, : High Level Radioactive Waste Management: Proceedings of the 6th Annual International Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, April May 5, (): Not Available: Books.

The 15th International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference (IHLRWM ) contains over papers. The conference theme, "Real World Solutions for Integrated Management of Used Fuel and HLW," reflects the progress and activities under way around the world that collectively demonstrate that technical solutions exist and are being implemented for the safe storage.

: High Level Radioactive Waste Management: Proceedings of the Fifth Annual International Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, May(): Not Available: BooksFormat: Paperback. Get this from a library.

Partnerships under pressure: managing commercial low-level radioactive waste. [United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.;]. Choosing a New Organization for Management and Disposition of Commercial and Defense High-Level Radioactive Materials (Rand Corporation Monograph) [Davis, Lynn E., Knopman, Debra, Greenberg, Michael D., Miller, Laurel E., Doll, Abby, Steinberg, Paul, Nardulli, Bruce R., LaTourrette, Tom, Clancy, Noreen, Mao, Zhimin] on *FREE Author: Lynn E.

Davis, Debra Knopman, Michael D. Greenberg, Laurel E. Miller, Abby Doll, Paul S. Steinberg. page: 93 Managing the Nation's Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste.

A federal government corporation and an independent government agency are the two most promising models for a new organization to manage and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United : Lynn E.

Davis, Debra Knopman, Michael D. Greenberg, Laurel E. Miller, Abby Doll, Paul S. Steinberg. Managing content. Repository dashboard. Support. FAQs. About About CORE Blog Contact us. Location of Repository Managing commercial high-level radioactive waste: summary.

Abstract. 64 p. Topics: Radioactive waste disposal--United States--Safety measures. Publisher. Managing the Nation’s Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste nuclear fuel cycle, 23 backend of fuel cycle, 25 front end of the fuel cycle, 24 reactor operation, 24 nuclear reactions, 21 effects of radiation, 22 fission, 21 radioactivity, 21 radioactive waste management policymaking, acceptable safety levels for a geologic repository, 48 *Managing the Nation's Commercial High-Level Radioactive Waste.

Figure Individual Radiation Dose as a Function of Water Travel Time From a Repository in Basalt Containing Reprocessing Waste FromTonnes of Spent Uranium Fuel. 10' 10' E 10' G) co C 0 10' a E 0 (9 10' ai o 0.

1U Iu. 1lu3 10U. 10' IC)7. Treatment and Conditioning of Nuclear Waste (Updated June ) Before disposal, nuclear waste needs to be in solid form and resistant to leaching. Packaging should be appropriate to the waste and its disposal. High-activity waste requires shielding.

High-level waste (HLW) is a type of nuclear waste created by the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It exists in two main forms: First and second cycle raffinate and other waste streams created by nuclear reprocessing. Waste formed by vitrification of liquid high-level waste.

Liquid high-level waste is typically held temporarily in underground tanks pending vitrification. Majumdar, Debu, and Indusi, Joseph P. Inventory of High Level Nuclear Wastes in US: Government High Level Waste, Existing Commercial High Level Waste, Existing Commercial Spent Fuel, and Projections of Commercial Spent nuclear waste management technical support in the development of nuclear waste form criteria: Task 3, Waste inventory review.

A series of publications from the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency on various aspects of radioactive waste management. The publications in this series of analytical reports and conference proceedings focus on the development of strategies for a safe, broadly acceptable management of sustainable and all types of radioactive waste and materials.U.S.

Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Congressional Research Service 1 Introduction Recent events have renewed long-standing congressional interest in safe management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other high-level nuclear waste.1 These issues have been examined and debated for decades, sometimes renewed by world events like the 9/11 terrorist attacks.Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste 3 generators pay the full cost of the disposal of their used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

The federal government did not meet its contractual obligation begin acceptingto used nuclear File Size: KB.

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